This week on the big show, Fingers and Tracy take a brief break from politics to discuss the bad behavior they’ve witnessed at the gym. Then it’s right back into the political arena with a discussion of the latest news about the Great Vape Scare of 2019 and the forth-coming FDA rules for vapor products, Michigan’s insane law that allows localities to seize and sell people’s houses for unpaid property taxes, and Elizabeth Warren’s plan to pay for Medicare for All.

 

From the show:

Shocker – The Great Vape Scare of 2019 was an over-hyped panic that in the end had little to nothing to do with store-bought vape products.

Via The New York Times:

A form of vitamin E has been identified as a “very strong culprit” in lung injuries related to vaping THC, health officials reported on Friday, a major advance in a frightening outbreak that has killed 40 people and sickened 2,051.

Many patients with the mysterious illness have wound up hospitalized in intensive care units, needing ventilators or even more desperate measures to help them breathe. Most are young, male adults or even teenagers.

“For the first time, we have detected a potential toxin of concern, vitamin E acetate, from biological samples from patients,” with lung damage linked to vaping, Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said at a news briefing.

The patients came from 10 states scattered around the country, so the findings are considered broadly applicable and unlikely to have resulted from a single vaping product or supplier.

The outbreak has revealed the existence of a vast, unregulated, shadowy marketplace of illicit or bootleg vaping products that are essentially a stew of unknown chemicals concocted, packed and sold by unknown manufacturers and sellers.

Late paying your property taxes? Michigan will gladly take your house off of your hands!

Via Reason

An 83-year-old retired engineer in Michigan underpaid his property taxes by $8.41. In response, Oakland County seized his property, auctioned it off to settle the debt, and pocketed nearly $24,500 in excess revenue from the sale.

Under Michigan law, it was all legal. And hardly uncommon.

Uri Rafaeli, who lost his property and all the equity associated with it, is just one of thousands of people to be victimized by Michigan’s uniquely aggressive property tax statute. The law, passed in 1999 in an attempt to accelerate the rehabilitation of abandoned properties, empowers county treasurers to act as debt collectors. In the process, it creates a perverse incentive by allowing treasurers’ offices to retain excess revenue raised by seizing and selling properties with delinquent taxes—even when the amount owed is miniscule, and even when the homes aren’t abandoned or blighted at all.

Elizabeth Warren’s Condescending Billionaire Tax Calculator